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here comes everybody


“For the first time in human history, individuals can design a life around the pursuit of interesting work.”

Richard Saul Wurman, TED Founder

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here comes everybody


“For the first time in human history, individuals can design a life around the pursuit of interesting work.”

Richard Saul Wurman, TED Founder

53 million people, and counting...

That’s how many Americans are working independently, as freelancers, indie professionals, creatives, free agents.

We’re everywhere: in accounting and design, programming and the law, consulting and carpentry. We work on our own or in small teams. We work with corporations, but not for them.

WE’RE SOLOISTS, THIS IS THE SOLO MOVEMENT, AND THIS IS OUR NEW WORLD OF WORK

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redesigning work


Justin Shiels, This Creative Lab

redesigning work


Justin Shiels, This Creative Lab

Here comes everybody.

The numbers for the solo population are uncertain. The 53 million census includes part-timers, moonlighters, and independents-in-transition; no one knows how many full-time soloists there are. Economists agree only that this migration away from jobs — out of organizations into work we make for ourselves — is speeding up. Big forces keep driving it:

 

  • Evolving technology and tools increasingly enable high-impact work to be done anywhere, with anyone.
     
  • Corporations continue losing scale; four decades of layoffs (plus one “jobless recovery”) have turned what once was a relationship between company and individual into a transaction.
     
  • More and more of the work of the economy is project work, creating unprecedented opportunities for specialized talent.
 

[Photograph by Wesley Verhoeve]

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the solo project


Impact Hub, Philadelphia

the solo project


Impact Hub, Philadelphia

The spreading dream of a Big Solo Life.

As significant as the economic forces driving the solo movement is a cultural one: the rising status of the indie professional. Soloists are disproportionately thought leaders, creatives, and taste makers — outsized influencers not just of the strategies of our corporate leaders and policymakers but of everything we watch, eat, listen to, and consume. Those of us who choose to work on our own, once suspect, are now respected and admired as never before.

Increasingly, the solo life is the work life people aspire to.

 
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our quarterly


Eryn Erickson, SoWorthLoving.com

our quarterly


Eryn Erickson, SoWorthLoving.com

The redesign of work.

Big picture? The decades-long transition from the industrial economy to the information economy has transformed every aspect of organizational life — except for the jobs themselves. Most jobs are still made the same way they’ve been made for a hundred years. They’re manufactured — optimized and commoditized for efficiency. The aim of their manufacture has nothing to do with making a work life irresistibly interesting.

ULTIMATELY, THIS IS WHAT THE SOLO MOVEMENT IS ABOUT: REDESIGNING THE WORLD OF WORK.

 
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our story


Susan Battista & Fritz Klaetke, 
Visual Dialogue

our story


Susan Battista & Fritz Klaetke, 
Visual Dialogue

Birth of The Solo Project.

We three founders of the Solo Project have long been bringing to life the changing world of work, as organization heads and soloists both. We helped build and lead the Inc. Magazine and Fast Company brands. We built destinations for the country’s leading entrepreneurs and innovators. We identified underserved populations, served them as markets, and transformed them into powerful, energized communities. Now we’re creating a destination, and a home, for people like ourselves — people animated by the opportunity to design a life around the pursuit of interesting work. A home for soloists. It’s called The Solo Project.